Correlation between metabolic syndrome factors and cigarette smoking

AUTHORS

Mojhgan Gharipour 1 , * , Roya Kelishadi 2 , Dana Zahra Siyadat 3 , Afshan Akhavan 4 , Katayoun Rabiei 5

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 Biochemist, Cardiovascular Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

2 Associate Professor, Cardiovascular Research Center , Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

3 Community Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Center , Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

4 General Practitioner, Cardiovascular Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

5 Cardiovascular Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Hormozgan Medical Journal: 11 (4); e89585
Published Online: January 27, 2008
Article Type: Research Article
Received: September 26, 2007
Accepted: January 27, 2008

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Abstract

Introduction: Cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of
cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies demonstrate the adverse effects of
smoking on serum lipid profile but there is no evidence that smoking is correlated
with metabolic syndrome components such as lipid profile and obesity. The
purpose of this study is evaluating lifestyle factors like smoking on metabolic
syndrome components.
Methods: This is a descriptive analytic study in which 5573 nondiabetic men
participated. Their biochemical indices including total cholesterol, triglyceride,
HDL and LDL were measured. Clinical and laboratory findings of smokers and
nonsmokers were compared by independent t-test and Chi-square test.
Results: Results indicate that LDL cholesterol (115.34±39.3 vs, 11.65±40.49)
and triglyceride (175.13±102.05 vs, 172.32±116.83) levels in smokers were
higher than nonsmokers. Body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-hip
ratio was lower in the nonsmokers. Mean systolic (117.25±17.745 vs.
112.06±15.888) and diastolic (76.23±10.458 vs. 73.66±10.048) blood pressures
in smokers were higher than nonsmokers (P<0.05). Proportion of individuals
with two metabolic syndrome components (triglyceride≥150mg/dl and
HDL<40mg/dl) according to ATPIII was more in smokers than nonsmokers
(39.64% vs. 33%) (P<0.05), but percentage of smokers with three factors was
unexpectedly higher (49.92% vs. 43.82%).
Conclusion: Findings support the hypothesis that lifestyle factors such as
smoking can adversely affect metabolic syndrome factors. The meaningful
difference in the results might be due to plentiful sample size whereas it may be
of no clinical significance, hence further studies are crucial.

Keywords

Metabolic Syndrome - Smoking – Biochemical Factors – Anthropometric Factors

© 2008, Hormozgan Medical Journal. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
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